Graphene Nanocomposite For Better Batteries

Graphene Nanocomposite For Better Batteries

Researchers use graphene and tin sandwich to make better battery electrodes and it’s baked at 572 degrees Fahrenheit (300 degrees Celsius) the tin turns into nanopillars that widen the gap between the graphene layers. The greater volume of tin provided by these tiny towers improves electrode performance and the flexibility of the graphene prevents electrode degradation. This nanoscale composite structure can be used for providing superior-capacity energy storage in reusable lithium ion batteries and graphene is a one-atom-thick carbon material with unique mechanical and electronic properties better than silicon or other semiconductor materials…………….

By On August 5, 2011 Respond
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Bridgelux Silicon LED

Bridgelux Silicon LED

Bridglux demonstrates dramatic advancements in Gan-On-Silicon technology for solid state lighting.Bridgelux silicon LED could lead to brighter, more affordable solid state lighting and by growing gallium nitride on low-cost silicon wafers, as opposed to the typical sapphire and silicon carbide substrates, the company has achieved an output of 135lm/W (lumens per watt) with a color correlated temperature of 4730K……..

By On March 12, 2011 Respond
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HP ProBook 6450B

HP ProBook 6450B

HP’s new Laptop ProBook 645B is for Business Users.ProBookB is with latest Intel Core i7, i5 and i3,Intel Turbo Boost and many more….

By On June 5, 2010 11 Responses
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A Quantum Physics Breakthrough: 80 Years Old Puzzle Solved To Make Computer 100,000 Times Faster

A Quantum Physics Breakthrough: 80 Years Old Puzzle Solved To Make Computer 100,000 Times Faster

The engineers of “School of Engineering and Applied Sciences” of Princeton University have made a breakthrough the development of new materials. They have solved an 80-year-old quandary in quantum physics. This can predict the kinetic energy of electrons in simple metals—and semiconductors—will enable computers to simulate the behavior of new materials up to 100,000 times […]

By On February 28, 2010 10 Responses
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