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Researchers Created A Jumping And Gliding Robot Inspired By A Flying Fish

Earlier we have seen researchers at Stanford University creating world’s first peel and stick solar cells and biological computer with human DNA. And lately, some researchers at Stanford University have developed a small ‘aircraft‘, inspired by a flying fish which can jump and glide over a greater distance than an equivalent jumping robot. The aircraft, or jumping and gliding robot can also adjust its launch angle depending on the surface to move and land gracefully without having to sacrifice distance.


Flying Fish Glider

Scientists used a carbon fiber spring in that gliding robot so that it can take off very easily. The robot has a pivoting wing that stays into place using simple magnets on the wing and the body, but locks into place to glide farther on the way down. This small robot can travel through the air farther, over its “ballistic jumping” peers. In fact, this gliding robot can travel a greater distance, land more gently, and, if necessary, adjust its launch angle without greatly compromising distance.

Jumping And Gliding Aircraft
Trajectory
Jumping And Gliding Mechanism
Jumpglider In Motion

After making this jumping glider, researchers started to analyze its performance with a high-speed camera. They found, though the robot can’t jump as high as a simple ballistic jumper of the same weight using the same energy due to having some drag inherent in the design, it was able to jump farther horizontally. Researchers found, if the robot glides at 58º angle, then it travels 40 percent farther, and if it glides at 45º angle, then it travels 20 percent farther.

In the video below can watch the jumpglider in action.

Source: Biomimetics & Dextrous Manipulation LaboratoryStanford UniversityEfficient Jumpgliding: Theory and Design Considerations (PDF)

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