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An Austrian Skydives From 13 Miles Above The Earth, Wants To Jump From Even Higher

Skydiving is a great thrilling activity. It takes a lot of gut and a different kind of sportive skill to actually perform it. That required skill is bravery. Not that it is daring and physically challenge and potentially life threatening that makes it a brave act to perform, but because it takes that free spirit inside of a person which has no fear to go ahead and skydive. Something of the same has been overcome and performed by the Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner and he has been dubbed as the “Fearless Felix” since his feat is not any usual skydiving but an extreme one according to Digital Trends.


He jumped from 71,851 feet high above the ground, which is something that only two other skydivers have done. He did this by jumping off from a high-altitude helium balloon from where he could even see the curvature of the earth. He had a 3 minute and 43 seconds free-fall from nearly 13.5 miles in the air and during this he went to a speed of 364.4 mph, which means 534 feet per second. His total jump was of 8 minutes and 8 seconds and he landed near Roswell, New Mexico at 9:50 AM on March 16.

But this is not the limit for him, the sky is the limit for him. He has planned on jumping from 120,000 feet in the air and through this he wants to break the sound barrier with his own body. The essential purpose is to test his limits and how much a human being could take. Over 50 years ago on August 16, 1960, Joe Kittinger of the USAF made history by ascending from the “highest step in the world”, which is the height being 102,800 feet in the air.

Back then it was done to test the ability of human body to sustain in spaceflight. The purpose of Felix is to “attempt to dare atmospheric limits holds the potential to provide valuable medical and scientific research data for future pioneers.” The Red Bull team is hoping to make the record, which will be the first of its kind. They are in fact targeting for achieving four world records. This would allow scientists and experts to explore future space endeavours by man. To follow up on the details of this whole attempt, click here.

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