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Researchers Found Genetic Defect To Trigger Liver Cancer

Once upon a time cancer was a lethal disease. Thanks to science, for which it’s no more a lethal. But still there are some cancer like liver cancer which can be dangerous. However, lately, a group of researchers from the Michigan State University has found genetic defect to trigger liver cancer.


Kill Cancer Cells

Researchers found a flaw called NCOA5 gene which is present in both men and women. This gene can lead to the most common type of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma. Interestingly, this type of liver cancer has been found to be two-to-four times more prevalent in men than women.

According to researchers, a genetic defect can trigger the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and some forms of diabetes. They also believe that this defective gene can even increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (also called adult-onset diabetes and noninsulin-dependent diabetes) in males, but not in females. Note that, Type 2 diabetes has been widely associated with liver cancer.

Hua Xiao, lead researcher of the project and associate professor of physiology in MSU’s College of Human Medicine said, “Estrogen may function through the NCOA5 gene and previously has been found to play somewhat of a protective role against both diseases, the result is a decreased risk in females. Since males produce lower amounts of estrogen, this can contribute to their susceptibility. At this point, it’s not known if the genetic deficiency can be reversed and needs to be investigated further. But if it can somehow be changed through treatments such as drug therapies, this could substantially increase the chances of men in particular warding off these diseases.”

The researchers discovery has been published online in the journal Cancer Cell.

Source: NewsMax Health

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