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Court Allows Dotcom To Pursue A Case Against Police For Damages

The law-enforcement agencies in New Zealand had been fairly out of their legal scope when they raided Dotcom’s estate and arrested him and his team. The court has now allowed Dotcom to pursue a case against the police to seek damages over the whole fiasco.


Kim Dotcom

Another entity that was actively involved in trying to implicate Dotcom is the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB). GCSB had been working in collaboration with the intelligence agencies internationally to somehow dismantle Dotcom’s so-called crimes.

GCSB has also been asked to cough up all the relevant details, especially those related to Echelon – an international network of intelligence agencies of New Zealand, Australia, US, UK and Canada.

The court has asked that GCSB must reveal which entities did it share the Dotcom-related information with. GCSB tried to retaliate by citing the usual excuse that doing so may undermine the national security of New Zealand. However, the court responded by stating that the information will be revealed to the public. A person was further nominated by the court to review, in person, the top-secret details which GCSB will provide.

Kim Dotcom stands a fairly good chance of being paid hefty damages over the raid on his mansion which led to his arrest. The court ruled during the hearing of the case that the warrant that was used in raiding the place was unlawfully procured.

The whole episode has brought the New Zealand government and security agencies into limelight. Both have collaborated with U.S. illegally, spied on a citizen of New Zealand illegally, and violated his many rights by arresting him on a false warrant. As surprising as it may seem, international operations instigated by FBI usually turn out to be that way.

Courtesy: NZ Herald

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