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FBI Launches Drive To Recover Stolen Arts Worth $500 Million, Announces $5 Million Reward

Just after midnight on March 18, 1990, two individuals entered the Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts in disguise of police officers, stole 13 pieces of art including original paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Manet and Degas, and left the building around one and half an hour later. The cost of all the stolen pieces of arts were around $500 million. Interestingly, on Monday, the 23rd anniversary of the theft from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on March 18, FBI renewed a campaign to find those missing art relics, offering $5 million reward for information leading to a successful recovery.


Arts Stolen From Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum In 1990

FBI believes that it knows who were involved behind this theft. FBI said that the suspects “are members of a criminal organization with a base in the mid-Atlantic states and New England.” The bureau also believes that the artwork including paintings by Rembrandt and Vermeer were taken to Connecticut and Philadelphia. The thieves tried to sell some of the artworks in Philadelphia about 10 years ago but failed to do so.

When reporters asked FBI at a Boston news conference to pronounce the name of the suspected thieves, the bureau declined to do so, saying doing so “might harm the ongoing investigation.”

However, FBI has uploaded high-resolution photos of every painting that went missing from the museum on its website with announcement that the informer who will help FBI by providing information leading to a successful recovery will get ‘$5 Million Reward.’ Anyone with any further tip or information about the stolen arts can call the FBI at 800-CALL-FBI or contact the agency online at https://tips.fbi.gov.

Source: FBI
Thanks To: The New York Times, CNN

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