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DistroKid Launched By Philip Kaplan, Offers Cheap Music Distribution

A number of online music distribution services currently exist but most of them either take a significant portion of the royalties or are pretty expensive. Philip Kaplan has now launched DistroKid, a new music service which aims to change this by offering highly affordable music distribution.


DistroKid

DistroKid essentially allows music artists to release unlimited number of tracks to a whole range of online music stores. All the artists need to do is pay up a fixed yearly fee for the service. Once they have done so, they are entitled to keep 100% of their royalties, which is rather remarkable. The home page of the service’s official site states that you can unlimited songs for one whole year by paying a mere $19.99.

Apparently Kaplan has been working on the service for a while now. According to him, “I’m the only employee. I’ve been working on it for a little over a year. The final major piece just went live a couple of days ago (Amazon distribution went live). Which is why I’m opening the service up to a wider audience today.”

At its launch, DistroKid already has a collection of 16,338 songs. Interestingly, founders of rival music distribution services have generously praised DistroKid and some have even signed up for the new service. One of the key reasons prompting such success is simply that DistroKid is a lot cheaper and far more affordable than the other online offerings.

Kaplan cites this key advantage in these words, “I’m a musician. Sometimes I record band rehearsals, sometimes my live shows, sometimes I make music at night using Garage Band. I have a ton of music. I just wanted a simple service that let me upload every song into stores after I’m done recording it. Current options make that nearly impossible/too expensive/too difficult.”

Source: DistroKid

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