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Apple vs Samsung: Samsung Continues The Battle Over Four New Patents

When Samsung recently discovered that the patent violation it had been so doggedly accusing Apple of is not really a violation since it was covered under a license, some thought this may put to rest the ¬†case from Samsung’s side. However, that is not to be. Samsung is back with four other patent violations against Apple, hence continuing the unending legal tussle.

The hopes for an end to the legal battle between Apple and Samsung proved futile when Samsung, rather than withdrawing the case when it was proved that the patent it was using to fight the case against Apple was not actually a patent violation, instead file yet another four new patent violation charges against Apple. The earlier, rather unfavorable for Samsung, decision was declared in France while this renewed legal procedure ensued in Germany. This time, Samsung has filed that Apple is violating the following four patents:

European patent 1679803: This patent is related to the data communication in a radio telecom system.

European patent 1720373 (B1): This is related to the method of using RACH message in a communication system.

Deutsches patent 10040386: This patent is related to the conversion from speech to text.

European patent 1215867: It is related to the method of using emoticons.

An official from FOSS Patent, Florian Mueller, was on the spot during the proceedings of the case. According to him, no matter how trivial the patent violations, if any, are, they certainly are serious business and need to be dealt with. This recent move shows just how convoluted the methodology for patenting technology-related creations is and that it needs a revamp so that tech giants are not engaged in a war of eternal legal battles over tiny, subtle patent infringements.

Image courtesy Andrew.

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